Need a job. Move to the Okanagan.

Need a job. Move to the Okanagan.

StasCan is reporting Canadian employers had 402,000 job vacancies in the third quarter of 2016, and the national job vacancy rate was 2.5%.

Both the overall number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate in the third quarter were little changed compared with the third quarter of 2015. However, there were notable changes among the provinces and territories.

Compared with the second quarter of 2016, the number of job vacancies (seasonally unadjusted) increased by 2.4% in Canada, while the job vacancy rate was unchanged.

The job vacancy rate refers to the share of jobs that are unfilled out of all payroll jobs available. It represents the number of job vacancies expressed as a percentage of labour demand, that is, the sum of all occupied and vacant jobs.

Change in the number of job vacancies between the third quarter of 2015 and the third quarter of 2016, by province and territory

Chart 1: Change in the number of job vacancies between the third quarter of 2015 and the third quarter of 2016, by province and territory

Provincial overview

British Columbia had the second largest increase in the number of vacancies (+5,700 or +8.1%), and the job vacancy rate rose to 3.6% in the third quarter, the highest rate in Canada. Full-time job vacancies were up 7,400 in this province compared with the third quarter of 2015, while part-time job vacancies were down 1,700. Within British Columbia, the number of job vacancies rose in Lower Mainland–Southwest (+7,300) and Vancouver Island and Coast (+1,700). In the third quarter, 5 of the 10 economic regions with the highest vacancy rates were in this province.

Banff–Jasper–Rocky Mountain House, Alberta 3.8
Lower Mainland–Southwest, British Columbia 3.8
Thompson–Okanagan, British Columbia 3.8
North Coast, British Columbia 3.7
Nunavut 3.1
Northeast, British Columbia 3.0
Toronto, Ontario 3.0
London, Ontario 3.0
Vancouver Island and Coast, British Columbia 3.0
Kitchener–Waterloo–Barrie, Ontario 2.9

Chart 2: Job vacancy rate by province and territory, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

Job vacancy rate by province and territory, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

Chart 2: Job vacancy rate by province and territory, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

 

Job vacancies by full-time and part-time status

Nationally, an increase in the number of vacancies for full-time work (+11,000 or +4.3%) from the third quarter of 2015 to the third quarter of 2016 was offset by a decrease in part-time vacancies (-11,000 or -7.8%). Although full-time vacancies rose nationally, it fell in five provinces, led by Alberta (-12,000).

The largest increases in full-time vacancies were observed in occupations in business, finance and administration; management; and natural and applied sciences. The overall decrease in part-time vacancies was mainly the result of declines in sales and service occupations, where many part-time jobs are found.

Number of job vacancies by broad occupational group, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

Chart 3: Number of job vacancies by broad occupational group (one-digit NOC¹), third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

Management occupations had the second largest increase in the number of vacancies in the third quarter compared with the same quarter in 2015, mostly due to more vacancies for managers in financial and business services. Natural and applied sciences occupations had the third largest increase in vacancies, driven by demand for computer and information systems professionals.

These increases were offset by a decline in sales and service occupations, the only broad occupational group with a notable decrease at the national level. The number of vacancies in this group was down 21,000 compared with the third quarter of 2015, driven by fewer vacancies for cashiers, as well as other sales support and related occupations, such as store shelf stockers, clerks and order fillers. Almost all of the decline (-19,000) was for part-time work.

Provincial job vacancies by occupation

The rise in job vacancies in British Columbia over the same period was spread across many broad occupational groups. The largest vacancy increase was in health occupations (+2,100).

 

Job vacancy rate by industrial sector

Compared with the third quarter of 2015, the job vacancy rate in the third quarter of 2016 rose in 3 of the 10 largest industrial sectors, led by professional, scientific and technical services. At the same time, the job vacancy rate fell in retail trade, and accommodation and food services.

Job vacancy rate in the 10 largest industrial sectors, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

Chart 4: Job vacancy rate in the 10 largest industrial sectors, third quarter 2015 and third quarter 2016

The job vacancy rate in professional, scientific and technical services rose to 3.4% compared with 2.5% in the same quarter one year earlier. Job vacancies in this sector increased by 8,500 (+38.8%) over the same period.

The job vacancy rate in retail trade fell to 2.6% in the third quarter from 3.7% in the third quarter of 2015. At the same time, the number of job vacancies in the sector decreased by 22,000 (-29.4%). Declines in the number of job vacancies and the job vacancy rate in retail trade occurred in every province and territory except Quebec, where there was little change.

Job vacancies and offered hourly wage

Nationally, the average offered hourly wage for job vacancies was $19.80 in the third quarter, up $1.35 or 7.3% compared with the same quarter a year earlier.

Changes in the average offered hourly wage can reflect a variety of factors, including wage growth and changes in the composition of job vacancies by occupation, sector and between part-time and full-time positions. For example, declines in the number of job vacancies for low-wage occupation groups can push offered wages higher. Inversely, fewer vacancies in high-wage occupation groups can lower the offered wage.

The average offered hourly wage rose in a majority of broad occupational groups in the third quarter, with the largest increase in management occupations, from $31.80 in the third quarter of 2015 to $35.25 in the third quarter of 2016. An increase of 3,400 in the number of vacancies for this high-wage occupational group also contributed to the rise in the national average.

From a sectoral perspective, the average offered hourly wage increased in 10 of the 20 industrial sectors, led by administrative and support services, which increased from $15.40 in the third quarter of 2015 to $17.70 in the third quarter of 2016. Changes in the sectoral composition of vacancies, including fewer vacancies in the low-wage retail trade sector and more vacancies in high-wage sectors such as finance and insurance, as well as professional, scientific and technical services, also pushed the offered wage higher compared with one year earlier.

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